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Southern DHB Smokefree South

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    Smokefree South - supporting a smokefree / auahi kore future

    Tobacco smoking is a major public health problem and is the leading cause of preventable death and disease in New Zealand. It results in almost 5,000 deaths every year, killing two thirds of those who smoke.

    Smokefree South is supportive of the Smokefree 2025 goal.  Information on the 2025 goal can be found here.

    The goal is driven by a vision that families, whānau are entitled:

    • to be well
    • to enjoy long life
    • to be free of chronic illness and
    • our children and grandchildren will be free from tobacco and live smokefree lives.

    Smokefree South aims to reduce the impact and incidence of tobacco related harm by:

    • increasing the number of people giving stopping smoking a go
    • reducing the number of young people starting smoking
    • working with councils to increase the number of smokefree spaces
    • helping organisations like workplaces, education settings, sports clubs and marae to create a smokefree culture
    • encouraging smokefree homes and cars
    • enforcing smokefree rules and regulations under the Smokefree Environments Act 1990.

    Smokefree South are members of the following three coalitions who promote smokefree people and places across Otago and Southland:

    • Smokefree Otago
    • Smokefree Murihiku
    • Smokefree Queenstown Lakes / Central Otago.

    Smoke-free Enforcement

    Supporting Compliance with Legislation

    The purposes of the Smoke-free Environments Act 1990 (the Act) are to:

    • reduce the exposure of people to second hand smoke and
    • regulate the marketing, advertising, and promotion of tobacco so that people are discouraged from using tobacco products, encouraged to stop smoking,  and helped to stay smokefree.

    Smokefree Environments Act 1990

    Role of the Smoke-free Enforcement Officers

    Designated staff at Public Health South work on behalf of the Ministry of Health to ensure the legislation is followed.  Smoke-free Enforcement Officers visit tobacco retailers, workplaces and licensed premises to remind them of their legal responsibilities and support them to be compliant under the Act.  They are available for any enquiries regarding the laws around smokefree laws.

    Smokefree Enforcement Officers contact details

    Complaints and Enquiries

    If you are concerned about any of the following, please get in touch with us:

    • selling tobacco products to people under the age of 18 (including online)
    • displaying or advertising tobacco products (including online)
    • selling single cigarettes or less than 30g of loose tobacco (including online)
    • smoking inside workplaces (including work vehicles) or
    • smoking inside licensed premises.

    Please phone Public Health South or fill out an online form if you want to speak to a Smoke-free Enforcement Officer. 

    Southern District Health Board Pēpi-Pod Programme

    The Southern District Health Board Pēpi-Pod Programme aims to reduce the rates of Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy and encourage the spread of safe sleep messages.

    The Pēpi-Pod is a portable sleep space for babies who are most at risk of Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy and provides protection from accidental suffocation in places such as adult beds, couches and other places where your baby may be sleeping.

    The 4 key messages this programme aims to spread are:

    • babies sleep on their back
    • with airways clear
    • in their own bed
    • with carer near.

    Referrals

    Criteria to receive a Southern District Health Board funded Pēpi-Pod is attached as a document below. Referral for a Pēpi-Pod can be made by filling in the referral form below and sending it through to pepi-pods@southerndhb.govt.nz.

    Procedures

    Stop Smoking Services - Why Should I use a Stop Smoking Service?

    Stopping smoking can be really difficult to do on your own.  Research tells us that by working with a stop smoking service you will be much more likely to stop than if you try it by yourself.  Stop smoking services are  flexible and will provide you with support as long as you need it.  And they are FREE!

    SOUTHERN STOP SMOKING SERVICE

    The Southern Stop Smoking Service offers FREE face-to-face support to stop smoking with seven coaches operating across Otago and Southland.  They provide free Nicotine Replacement Therapy (patches, gum, lozenges) to support people on their journey to becoming smokefree.  Referrals can be made the following ways:

    Free phone 0800 925 242 Email admin@stopsmoking.nz Self refer here Online Referral for Southern Stop Smoking Service

     

    What can I Expect From the Southern Stop Smoking Service?

    All the coaches are trained stop smoking professionals and will offer you structured support on preparing to stop, stopping and staying smokefree.

    Carbon Monoxide (CO) Monitor

    When you smoke a cigarette you take CO and loads of toxins into your body.  CO is really damaging as it takes away oxygen from you which you need to be healthy.  If you are pregnant and smoke, then your baby gets that CO as well and that can be harmful to their growth and development.

    Your stop smoking coach uses a nifty wee hand-held machine that measures your CO levels – all you have to do is blow into it   When you start working with your coach you can expect your CO levels to be high (if you are still smoking), but once you stop smoking those levels will drop much lower.  The readings can be really motivating and help you monitor how you are progressing on your smokefree journey.

    Preparing to Stop Smoking

    If you are getting ready to stop smoking, your coach can give you information and advice on how best to prepare yourself, including information about what medications will best suit you if you choose to use any. You can talk with your coach about any worries you have about stopping smoking, any previous attempts you have made before, your smoking patterns and your reasons for wanting to stop.  This will help you to get started with planning your quit date.

    Stopping Smoking

    Your coach will work alongside you to help you set a date to stop smoking. This is the date where you commit to completely stop smoking and decide N.O.P.E (Not One Puff Ever).  Your coach can help and support you to cope with the feelings and withdrawals you may experience during this time.

    Staying Smokefree

    Your coach can work with you on changing your routines (that in the past were created around smoking), triggers, managing stressful situations and cravings.

    Your Smokefree Future

    In your final meetings with your coach you will be able to look to a smokefree future and what supports are available if needed. When you successfully stop smoking you will join the 85% of people in New Zealand who do not smoke!

    QUITLINE

    Quitline is New Zealand’s national stop smoking service and is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help people become smokefree. Quitline offers free support online, by phone and text.

    People can access support by:

    calling Quitline on 0800 778 778 - advisors will work with you to make a plan joining Quitline's blog community - get 24-hour support from people who are trying to stop smoking as well text 4006 visiting Quitline on Facebook joining the Txt2Quit service online - get sent texts to motivate you on your smokefree journey, or you can sign up over the phone getting nicotine patches, gum and lozenges prescriptions for $5.00 each by ordering online or over the phone.

     

    While in Hospital

    Your doctor, nurse and other health professionals will ask you about whether you smoke or not.  If you do smoke they can arrange Nicotine Replacement Therapy for you during your hospital stay.  They can also arrange an appointment with the local stop smoking coach when you are back home.

    Visiting Your Medical Centre

    Your GP or Practice Nurse will ask you about whether you smoke or not.  If you do smoke they can arrange Nicotine Replacement Therapy for you and arrange an appointment with the local stop smoking coach.

    Why can it be so Hard to Stop Smoking?

    Cigarettes contain nicotine and around 4,000 toxic chemicals.  People continue to smoke because they become dependent on, or addicted to, nicotine.

    Nicotine is present in the leaves of tobacco plants.  When tobacco is smoked the nicotine is carried down into the lungs, then into the blood and then  the heart.   The nicotine then travels to the brain and around to the rest of the body.  This process happens very quickly.

    Nicotine, like other drugs such as cocaine and amphetamines, acts on a particular part of the brain called the reward centre.  With the continued use of nicotine or drugs over time, the brain actually changes and comes to rely on these substances. 

     

    MEDICINES THAT CAN HELP YOU STOP SMOKING

    The approved stop smoking medicines that are funded and available in New Zealand are:

    Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) Patch, gum, lozenge, oral spray, inhalator Varenincline Pfizer (formally known as Champix) Zyban Nortriptyline

    Nicotine Patch

    Strengths:

    21mg, 14mg, 7mg – to meet individual needs.

    Using it:

    Put patch on a clean, dry and hairless part of the skin. Use a new patch on a different area of skin each day, and leave on for 24 hours. Video about how to use Nicotine Patches is available below

     

     

     Good points:

    Easy to use and discreet. Gives a constant level of nicotine throughout the day.

     Things to think about:

    Patches must not be cut or put on skin that is broken, burnt or inflamed. Wait 10 minutes after a bath or shower before putting your patch on. Wash your hands after handling the patch to remove all traces of nicotine. If you have any sleep disturbance or vivid dreams remove the patch before bed. Throw away used patches safely out of reach of children and pets.

     Cost and availability:

    FREE when enrolled with the Southern Stop Smoking Service. Available on prescription from GP or from any community pharmacy at a cost of $5.00 per product (patch, gum, lozenge).

     How long do I take it?

    About 8 weeks for a high dose, then 4 more weeks for medium and low doses.

     Not suitable for:

    Children under the age of 12 years. People who are allergic to sticking plaster or have a severe skin reaction to it.

     Further information:

    For pregnant and breastfeeding women, NRT is always safer than continued smoking. The oral products (gum, lozenge, spray) are the first choice.  If patches need to be used, take them off overnight.  During breastfeeding, ideally use the gum or lozenge after feeding.

    Nicotine Gum

    Strengths:

    4mg and 2mg – to meet individual needs.

     Using it:

    Use the gum 20 minutes before you would usually have a smoke. Chew the gum until you get a peppery taste, then rest it between your gum and cheek. Repeat this process every few minutes for 30 minutes then discard safely out of reach of children and pets. Do not chew continuously like normal gum. Can be used in combination with patches. Video about how to use Nicotine Gum is available below

     Good points:

     

    Good points:

    Discreet product to use. Looks like regular gum. Available in mint and fruit flavour.

     Things to think about:

    If not used as per instructions can cause indigestion. The taste can take some time to get used to. Avoid eating and drinking while using the product.

     Cost and availability:

    FREE when enrolled with the Southern Stop Smoking Service Available on prescription from GP or from any community pharmacy at a cost of $5.00 per product (patch, gum, lozenge).

     How long do I take it?

    8 to 12 weeks.

     Not suitable for:

    Children under the age of 12 years. People who have false teeth or  braces as the gum may stick.

    Further information:

    Okay to use if pregnant and breastfeeding but discuss risks and benefits with health professional or stop smoking coach.

    Nicotine Lozenge

    Strengths:

    2mg and 1 mg – to meet individual needs.

     Using it:

    Use the lozenge 20 minutes before you would usually have a smoke. Suck the lozenge until you get a peppery taste, then rest it between your gum and cheek. Repeat this process every few minutes for 30 minutes then discard safely out of reach of children and pets. Do not chew or swallow lozenge. Can be used in combination with patches. Video about how to use Nicotine Lozenge is available below

     Good points:

    Discreet product to use. Fast acting.

     Things to think about:

    Avoid eating and drinking whilst using product. Can cause hiccups and excess saliva.

     Cost and availability:

    FREE when enrolled with the Southern Stop Smoking Service. Available on prescription from GP or from any community pharmacy at a cost of $5.00 per product (patch, gum, lozenge).

     Not suitable for:

    Children under the age of 12 years.

     Further information:

    Okay to use if pregnant and breastfeeding but discuss risks and benefits with health professional or stop smoking coach.

    Nicotine Mouth Spray

    Strength:

    150 x 1mg doses per dispenser.

     Using it:

    The spray releases a 1mg liquid dose of nicotine into the mouth. Should be sprayed into the inside of the cheek, avoid the lips and do not spray towards back of throat. Spray but DO NOT inhale at the same time. Wait a minute or so before swallowing. Can be used in combination with patches, gum, lozenge.

     Good points:

    Discreet product to use. Fast acting. Easy to use. Faster acting than some other NRT products.

     Things to think about:

    Avoid eating and drinking whilst using product. Can cause hiccups and a hot sensation in the mouth.

     Cost and availability:

    This product is not funded.  Can be purchased over the counter from supermarkets or community pharmacies for the normal retail price.

     Not suitable for:

    Children under the age of 12 years.

     Further information:

    Okay to use if pregnant and breastfeeding but discuss risks and benefits with health professional or stop smoking coach.

    Nicotine Inhalator

    Strength:

    15 mg inhalator

     Using it:

    The plastic mouthpiece comes with nicotine cartridges which are changed at regular intervals. Puff on it like a cigarette and the nicotine is absorbed through the lining of the mouth. Can be used in combination with patches, gum, lozenge. Video about how to use Nicotine Inhalator is available below

     Good points:

    Mimics the hand to mouth action of a cigarette. Small, so easy to carry around in a pocket or bag. Convenient as can be used in public or indoor spaces, such as the workplace, as there is no smoke or vapour released.  Nothing goes into the lungs! It can be used during those strong urges to smoke (at work, at night, when busy).

     Things to think about:

    It can be quite strong at first and can hit the back of the throat. The cartridges should be kept at room temperature before use, to help deliver the nicotine more quickly. Avoid eating and drinking while using the product.

     Free and available:

    This product is not funded. Can be purchased over the counter from supermarkets or community pharmacies for the normal retail price.

     Not suitable for:

    Children under the age of 12 years.

     Further information:

    Okay to use if pregnant and breastfeeding but discuss risks and benefits with health professional or stop smoking coach.

    Varenicline Pfizer (previously Champix)

    Using it:

    Oral tablet. You can start by taking Varenicline Pfizer for at least one week before you stop smoking or stop smoking between 8 and 35 days of using Varenicline Pfizer. Important to complete the 12-week course.

     Good Points:

    Easy to use. Twice daily dosing. Can reduce the urge to smoke and remove the pleasure associated with smoking.

     Things to think about:

    Should not be used with other stop smoking medications. Common adverse effects may include nausea, abnormal dreams and sleep disturbance. If you experience changes in mood or behaviour, stop taking Varenicline Pfizer and contact your health care worker immediately.

     Free and available:

    One 3 month course fully funded every year (subject to Special Authority Criteria) on prescription from your GP.

     Not suitable for:

    Children/young people under the age of 18 years. Do NOT use if pregnant, breastfeeding or allergic to it.

    Zyban (Bupropion)

    Using it:

    Oral tablet. 7-12 week course.

    Good points:

    Easy to use. Twice daily dosing. Reduces the urge to smoke and other withdrawal symptoms.

    Things to think about:

    Common side effects include dry mouth, insomnia, headaches, rash.

    Cost and availability:

    Fully funded on prescription from your GP.

     Not suitable for:

    Children/young people under the age of 18 years. Do NOT use if: pregnant or breastfeeding have an eating disorder allergic to it if taking Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOI) within 14 days have had seizures have central nervous system tumour are quitting alcohol or sleeping pills at the same time take caution if you have liver or kidney disease.

    Norpress (Nortriptyline)

    Using it:

    Oral tablet. 12 week course.

     Good points:

    Easy to use. Work up to 3 to 4 pills daily. Reduces the urge to smoke and other withdrawal symptoms.

     Things to think about:

    Common side effects include drowsiness, dry mouth and constipation.

     Cost and availability:

    Fully funded on prescription from your GP.

     Not suitable for:

    Children/young people under the age of 18 years. Do NOT use if: pregnant or breastfeeding have had a recent heart attack allergic to it have taken Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOI) within 14 days.

     

    STOPPING SMOKING IS GOOD FOR YOU!

    There are so many health benefits to not smoking, and they start pretty much the moment you decide to ditch the cigarettes!

    8 HOURS AFTER STOPPING

    Nicotine and carbon monoxide levels in the blood go down by half and your oxygen levels return to normal.

    24 HOURS AFTER STOPPING

    That carbon monoxide is gone from the body. The lungs start to clear out mucus and other smoking junk.

    48 HOURS AFTER STOPPING

    There is no nicotine left in your body and your sense of taste and smell is improving.

    72 HOURS AFTER STOPPING

    Your breathing will start to feel easier and your energy levels will start to improve.

    2-12 WEEKS AFTER STOPPING

    Your circulation is improving.  Your blood is now well oxygenated and helping to improve your health.

    3-9 MONTHS OF STOPPING

    Coughs and wheezing improve and your breathing is continuing to improve.

    1 YEAR SMOKEFREE

    Your risk of a heart attack falls to about half that of someone who smokes.

    10 YEARS SMOKEFREE

    The risk of getting lung cancer falls to about half that of someone who smokes.

    15 YEARS SMOKEFREE

    Your risk of a heart attack falls to the same as someone who has never smoked.

    SECOND-HAND SMOKE

    A lit cigarette is like a little toxic waste dump on fire, giving out health-endangering smoke.  It affects the people around you, especially children. 

    80-85% of smoke is actually INVISIBLE.  What you see when you smoke a cigarette is only a very small percentage.  There is NO safe level of second-hand smoke.

    If you stop smoking then not only will your health improve, but the health of your loved ones will too!   Learn more here: Second-Hand Smoke

    WHAT IS SMOKING COSTING ME?

    If you smoke you will know that it is very, very expensive!  Someone who smokes a pack a day is probably spending just over $200 a week on cigarettes. 

    Stopping smoking will give you an instant pay rise!  Use this calculator to work out what you could be saving a week, month, year and lifetime once you become smokefree.