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Roxburgh Medical Centre

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    We provide medical services in the Roxburgh Area. We have a GP Clinic, Practice Nurse Services and District Nursing.

     

    Staff
    Our team is made up of a part time GP and part time Nurse Practitioner  (see details below under “General Practitioners”)  

    Nurse Practitioner: Kate Stark

    Practice Manager: Joan Anderson

    Nursing Staff: Frans Theewis, Glenda Rickerby, Christine Young, Michelle Shortfall and Jane Ellison, Sally Hewson

    Receptionists: Rosanne Keeler, Sara Kelly

    COVID-19 Vaccination

    • Eligible GP enrolled patients only
    • By invitation only
    • Group 1
    • Group 2
    • Group 3
    • Māori or Pasifika: age 55 and over
    • Māori or Pasifika: age 12 - 54
    • Group 4: age 30 - 64

    We will invite our registered patients for a vaccination when available. Please wait to hear from us.

    Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is an important step you can take to protect yourself, your kaumātua and whānau from the effects of the virus. For more information on the COVID-19 vaccines and eligibility visit Ministry of Health - COVID-19 vaccines

    If you are getting a flu, MMR or other vaccine, it will affect timing of the COVID-19 vaccination. Please discuss with your health provider.

    Practitioners

    • Dr Ronald Dittrich

      General Practitioner - Vocationally Registered
    Adult and Child Medical Care

    Your GP's surgery is far more than a place to go when you are feeling unwell and needing a quick cure. The doctor who sees you has gone through an extensive medical training to equip her or him to help children and adults of all ages with a range of physical and emotional difficulties. GPs are at the centre of the healthcare hub and will be aware of services and expertise that are available locally and further-a-field. GPs are also aware of the link that stress and unhappy life events have on physical health so know when to suggest a talking therapy rather than medication.

    Minor Accident Care

    Primary care practices offer a range of services and are able to deal with most minor accident care. If they are not able to deal with an injury they will refer on to the appropriate service.

    Minor Surgery

    Minor surgery is commonly provided in primary care practices, providing fast, competent removal and biopsies of skin lesions. Other services include cosmetic work such as removal of benign moles and skin tags. Ingrown toenail surgery is also commonly provided. 
    These conditions do not need to be referred to a hospital, perhaps saving you a long wait or a cancelled appointment when a more serious case takes priority. 
    If your doctor is unable to provide the procedure you need, he/she may know a neighbouring GP who does. Otherwise, the PHO will have a list of GPs trained in particular operations.

    Liquid Nitrogen

    Liquid nitrogen is a fast, effective treatment provided in many practices to treat viral warts, sun damaged skin, skin tags and many benign cosmetic lesions. It comes in a container with a nozzle and is usually applied by swab or spray. Often one treatment is all that is needed but sometimes it may need repeating after two weeks.
    Because it cannot be stored for too long, you will often find that your GP will treat a number of patients one after the other. 

    For more information click here.

    IUCD Insertion

    An Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD) is inserted into a woman’s uterus to prevent pregnancy. Depending on the type of device, it will need to be changed after between three and five years.  
    One particular brand of IUCD is often used to reduce heavy bleeding during periods. 

    Immunisation

    Immunisations are provided at all primary care practices and are one of the most important services they provide. Immunisation has led to the decline of many lethal diseases including meningococcal B meningitis.

    The National Immunisation Schedule offers a series of vaccines free to babies, children, adolescents and adults. Visit the Ministry of Health website http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/new-zealand-immunisation-schedule to find out what vaccines are on the Schedule and when they are given.  Additional vaccines are provided free for certain eligible groups considered to be at high risk because of other medical conditions; find out more here http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/new-zealand-immunisation-schedule. These and other vaccines such as travel vaccines can be purchased by other people if they want them.

    Immunisations are given by a practice nurse or doctor, having ensured beforehand that the person is not ill or suffering from allergies. Risks associated with immunisation are very rare.

    Children have their own document to keep a record of these injections. Under the age of 5 this is usually their Well Child/Tamariki Ora My Health Book. The immunisation record may need to be shown, for example, when starting school or early childcare. The staff will also record the immunisation details on New Zealand’s National Immunisation Register. This computerised information system holds details of all immunisations given to children here and will alert families when immunisations are due.

    Cervical Screening

    All women who have ever been sexually active should have regular cervical smear tests every three years between the ages of 25 and 69. This includes women who have been immunised against HPV. This test detects abnormal cells which, if left untreated, could become cervical cancer. Very often these cells are made abnormal by a human papillomavirus (HPV) which is a sexually transmitted virus. Regular tests and treatment reduces the likelihood of this sort of cancer by around 90%. 

    For more information about cervical smear tests click on the link to the National Screening Unit website http://www.nsu.govt.nz/current-nsu-programmes/national-cervical-screening-programme.aspx

    Spirometry

    Spirometry is a tool that measures how effectively your lungs are working. It is able to show how much air lungs are able to hold (their volume) and how much air can be breathed in and out (inhaled and exhaled) which is called flow. This tool is used to assess damage caused by conditions like COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – a group that includes bronchitis and emphysema), pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis and asthma. Results are shown on a graph called a pneumotachograph.

    For more information click on the following link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirometry

    Travel Advice / Immunisations

    Another service offered to you at your GP surgery (primary care practice) is advice and immunisation before you go to another country. While you are likely to have the immunisations needed to live in New Zealand, there may be other injections you need to protect yourself before going for example to Africa or South America. In some places you will need protection from rabies or malaria. Yellow fever vaccinations are only available at approved centres; please click here to view the centres in the Auckland region. Your doctor will be able to tell you what diseases you will need to be protected from in any named country and advise you on other medical matters. 

    Immigration Medicals

    Applicants for New Zealand visas may be required to provide medical and chest x-ray certificates to demonstrate an acceptable standard of health. Immigration New Zealand uses eMedical, an online platform for processing immigration health examinations. The examining doctor records the applicant’s health examination results in eMedical then electronically submits them to Immigration New Zealand where they are associated with the applicant’s visa application once it is submitted. Only doctors who have been approved by Immigration NZ are able to conduct the medical examinations. The immigration officer who assesses the applicant’s visa application will determine whether they have an acceptable standard of health. Visa applicants requiring an immigration medical examination must make an appointment with an eMedical enabled clinic on Immigration New Zealand’s approved list.

    Fee comment

    Office Hour Fees
    Standard Consult 
    Enrolled Non Enrolled
    Community Services Card
    Non Enrolled
    No Community Services Card
     Child Under 13 No Charge $30 $30
    Child 13 to 17 $35 $70 $85
    Adult 18-24 $45 $70 $90
    Adult 24-65 $45 $75 $90
    Follow Up Consult 1/2 fee Full fee Full fee
    Care Plus Visit $30 n/a n/a
    ACC Co Payment
    Office Hours
    Enrolled Seasonal Worker
    Temp Visitors
    Non Enrolled Residents
    Under 13  No Charge No Charge No Charge
    13 years to Adult $30 $55 $70
    After Hours Charges Enrolled Seasonal Worker
    Temp Visitors
    Non Enrolled Residents
    ACC Under 13 Years No Charge No Charge No Charge
    ACC Over 13 Years $75 $95 $120
    Home/Surgery Under 13 No Charge No Charge No Charge
    Home/Surgery Over 13 $105 $145 $245

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION
    These charges are minimum charges. If there is an extended consult or complex emergency procedure, or a higher level of consumables used, we reserve the right to increase the charge.

    Non NZ residents will be charged for after hours calls - regardless of age.