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Get vaccinated

Vaccinations

Vaccinations are now available to everyone in New Zealand aged 5 years and over, and the vaccination programme is continuing at all Alert Levels. You can book your appointment online at bookmyvaccine.nz or 0800 28 29 26.

Unable to access a COVID-19 vaccine clinic?

If you know someone who is unable to access a vaccination clinic (due to disability, a mental illness diagnosis, a health condition or other reason) please support them to fill out this form or call 03 476 9977 and we'll be in touch to work through a solution.

COVID-19 vaccine rollout

vaccinated character

Protect yourself and the community

The Southern District's COVID-19 vaccination rollout is well underway, offering first, second and booster doses to protect our communities against COVID-19. The vaccine is free to everyone.

Southern vaccine clinics and booking information can be found here.

 

 


What does this mean for you in the Southern District?  

Boosters

Anyone aged 18 or older who have had their second dose of the Pfizer vaccine can get a booster. People will be eligible to receive their booster dose three months after their second dose.

  • If you’re eligible, you can book an appointment for your booster dose on BookMyVaccine.nz or by calling the COVID Vaccination Healthline on 0800 28 29 26 (8am to 8pm, 7 days a week).
  • Healthcare and border workers who got their second Pfizer vaccine dose over 6 months ago are a priority group for booster doses.
  • People can get a booster if they got their earlier vaccinations in New Zealand or overseas and regardless of which vaccine they got overseas. 
  • People can get a booster the same way they got their previous doses, at vaccination clinics, pharmacies, and GP clinics. 
  • The Pfizer vaccine for boosters is the same formula and dosage used already in New Zealand’s vaccination rollout.
  • No prescription or written consent form is needed to get a Pfizer vaccine booster dose.
  • Booster vaccine doses are free. 

More information:

  • Vaccination is the best protection against COVID-19. 
  • Increasing vaccination coverage of first and second doses, particularly for Māori and Pacific people, remains the Government’s first priority in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 
  • We will also be making sure older people, including people in residential care, have good access to booster doses when they become eligible. 
  • After six months your immunity from two doses may wane and booster vaccine doses will reduce the risk of severe disease caused by COVID-19, which will reduce the burden on hospitals and other healthcare providers, and protect those doing jobs that put them at high risk of exposure to COVID-19. 
  • Booster doses are different from additional primary doses for severely immunocompromised people. Severely immunocompromised people receiving additional primary doses of Pfizer vaccine will need to wait for at least 3 months after their additional primary dose before getting a booster.
  • Pregnant people can receive a booster dose.The booster vaccine can be given at any stage of pregnancy at least 3 months after the primary vaccine. The Ministry of Health recommends the Pfizer vaccine for pregnant people to protect them and their baby against the effects of COVID-19. Pregnant people should discuss the timing of their booster, and any concerns with their lead maternity carer, obstetrician or general practitioner.   
Booster doses for 16 and 17-year-olds                                                                        
  • A Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster dose will be available from 7 April for all rangatahi aged 16 and 17, six months after completion of the primary course (for most people, this is two doses).
  • Medsafe has provisionally approved the booster dose for this age group, following a robust assessment of Pfizer’s application.
  • A booster dose is especially recommended for 16 and 17-year-olds who are at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19. This includes those who are immunocompromised (or living with a family member who is immunocompromised) and Māori and Pacific rangatahi.
  • The side effects of this booster vaccine for this age group are expected to be the same as those for people aged 18 and older.
  • For rangatahi under 16 years of age, a booster dose is not currently approved by Medsafe or recommended by the immunisation programme.

How can I get a booster?

  • You can check when you are due for a booster by visiting mycovidrecord.nz or referring to your purple vaccination card, if you have one.
  • If your second dose was six months ago you can get your booster by:
    • finding a walk-in vaccination centre at BookMyVaccine.nz. 
    • From 14 April, 16 and 17-year-olds will be able to book an appointment on BookMyVaccine.nz. 
    • From 14 April, you’ll also be able to book for yourself or make a whānau booking (group bookings for more than one person) by calling the COVID Vaccination Healthline 0800 28 29 26 (8am - 8pm, 7 days a week).
    • COVID-19 vaccines will continue to be available at mobile and pop-up vaccination clinics.
  • If you’ve had COVID-19, you should wait at least 3 months after you test positive before you receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Interpretation services, and text, email and NZ Relay options for deaf and hearing impaired are available if you need them on 0800 28 29 26 (8am - 8pm, 7 days a week). There is also a specialist team for disabled people (option 2 on the 0800 number).

What will happen if I decide to wait until I am 18?
Evidence shows your protection against infection after the primary vaccination course decreases over time. Getting a ‘top up’ vaccine after your two doses helps boost your immunity against COVID-19.

Do I need my booster to get a My Vaccine Pass?
Currently you do not need to have a booster to be certified as ‘fully vaccinated’ for My Vaccine Pass or an International Travel Vaccination Certificate.
 
If I received my second dose just before I turned 18, do I wait 3 months or 6 months before I get a booster?
If you are 18 or over, you can have your booster dose 3 months following completion of your primary course. 
 
If I received my second dose just before I turned 16, can I get a booster dose after 6 months?
If you are 16, you can have a booster dose 6 months following completion of your primary course.
 
If I’m 16/17 and covered under a vaccination order, am I required to get a booster to keep my job?
People under the age of 18 are not currently covered by a vaccination order.
 
How many rangatahi aged 16 and 17 are eligible for a booster dose?
As of 4 April, around 35 percent (around 36,000) of rangatahi aged 16 and 17 years will be eligible to receive their Pfizer booster dose because it has been at least six months since completing a primary dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. This includes 23 percent (5,180) of Māori and 39 percent (4,185) of Pacific peoples aged 16 and 17 years.
By the first week of July, 95 percent of rangatahi aged 16 and 17 years who have completed their primary course will be eligible for a Pfizer booster dose.

When will a booster be approved for 12–15-year-olds?
For rangatahi under 16 years of age, a booster dose is not currently approved by Medsafe or recommended by the immunisation programme.
Medsafe has received some data from Pfizer for booster doses for the 12–15-year-old age group, however, they are currently waiting for Pfizer to submit further information. Once Medsafe receives this additional information, it will be reviewed as a priority.
Clinicians may consider giving a booster dose to 12- to 15-year-olds who are clinically at-risk. This would be considered unapproved (off-label) use and requires a prescription under Section 25 of the Medicines Act 1981, following a conversation about the risks and benefits.

Vaccinations for 5 to 11-year-olds

All children aged 5 to 11-years-old are now eligible to get immunised against COVID-19.

Although tamariki have a lower risk of health impacts from COVID-19 than older age groups, it can still have serious consequences, particularly for children with compromised immune systems or significant respiratory conditions. A vaccine for tamariki can help keep them and their communities and whānau safe. The child doses of the Pfizer vaccine are smaller than the ones used for people over age 12 — a child dose is one third of the adult dose.

Like adults, tamariki need two doses of the vaccine to be fully protected. We recommend these are at least 8 weeks apart. The interval can be shortened to 21 days if needed, for example if your child is starting treatment with immunosuppressants. Children are not eligible for booster vaccinations.

At the appointment, both the adult and child can ask as many questions as they like.

In Southern, bookings are currently required for all 5 to 11-years-old vaccinations, unless a provider is promoting walk ins vaccinations for 5 to 11-year-olds. You can online at Book My Vaccine or by calling 0800 28 29 26 between 8am – 8pm, 7 days a week.

The rollout for 5 to 11-year-olds in Southern will be a staged process. Please be kind and patient while we work hard to extend vaccination availability across the district.

Medsafe, New Zealand’s medicines and vaccine regulator, has granted approval for the use of the Pfizer paediatric COVID-19 vaccine in children aged 5 to 11-years-old. Medsafe has followed the same review process that it does for all other vaccines and medicines that it approves for use in New Zealand.

Pfizer has trialled their COVID-19 vaccine in children aged 5 to 11 years and the vaccine is being used overseas to protect this age group. Children are not eligible for the AstraZeneca vaccine.

For more information about the COVID-19 vaccination for tamariki and what will happen at the immunisation appointment please click here.

Does my 5-11 year old tamariki need a third dose of the vaccine?

Severely immunocompromised children aged 5 to 11 can now receive a third primary dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.  There are specific criteria for which children qualify for a third primary dose.    

The third primary dose must be prescribed by an authorised prescriber such as a medical practitioner or nurse practitioner. Appointments to discuss whether your child is eligible for a third primary dose are free.  

Scripts for a third primary dose can be taken to any vaccination site.   The third primary dose should be given 8 weeks after the second dose but may be given after 4 weeks depending on current or planned immunosuppressive therapies.   

For full information see: Third vaccination now available for immune compromised tamariki | Ministry of Health NZ

Third primary doses

Do I need a third dose of the vaccine?
The COVID-19 Technical Advisory Group has recommended that individuals aged 12 and older with severe immunocompromise receive a third primary dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. There are specific criteria for who can qualify for a third primary dose, this includes individuals who were undergoing immunosupressive therapies prior to or at the time of their first or second dose.  The Ministry of Health has published eligibility criteria on its website.

Does my 5-11 year old tamariki need a third dose of the vaccine?
Severely immunocompromised children aged 5 to 11 can now receive a third primary dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.  There are specific criteria for which children qualify for a third primary dose.    
The third primary dose must be prescribed by an authorised prescriber such as a medical practitioner or nurse practitioner. Appointments to discuss whether your child is eligible for a third primary dose are free.  
Scripts for a third primary dose can be taken to any vaccination site.   The third primary dose should be given 8 weeks after the second dose but may be given after 4 weeks depending on current or planned immunosuppressive therapies.   

for further information: Third vaccination now available for immune compromised tamariki | Ministry of Health NZ

Why is a third dose recommended?
Individuals who are severely immunocompromised are at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19 and might not produce a sufficiently strong immune response after two doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. A third primary dose may be beneficial. The third primary dose is optional but recommended.  

Is this a booster dose?
A primary third dose is different to a booster dose for the general population.  Under the current immunisation programme, you can receive a booster dose of the Pfizer vaccine in New Zealand 3 months after your third primary dose. 

Doesn’t Medsafe need to approve the use for a third dose?  
Administration of a third primary dose is allowed under s23 of the Medicines Act for a specific purpose. The third primary dose is considered ‘off label’. Studies have been reviewed by the COVID-19 Technical Advisory Group, and they have made this recommendation for individuals who are severely immunocompromised.  
 
Will it cost me anything? 

There will be free access to those who are eligible for a third primary dose. 
 
How will people know if they qualify? 
The eligibility requirements will be published on the Ministry of Health website. They are complex and may need to be interpreted by your GP or other specialist to see if they apply to you. 
 
How will the Ministry/DHBs ensure that the third dose is delivered equitably? 
The Ministry will be providing guidance on how GPs and Specialists might be able to proactively identify patients who meet the criteria for a third primary dose. 
 
What are the expected side effects to a third dose of Pfizer? 
So far, reactions reported after the third dose in small studies were similar to those after two doses, with fatigue and pain at injection site being the most commonly reported side effects, and overall, most side effects reported were mild to moderate. (from CV-TAG memo) 
 
What about front line workers/border workers? When can they receive a third dose?
We know there are people at an increased risk, like frontline border and health care workers, who were vaccinated earlier this year and who are now wondering if they need a booster shot. These people can receive a booster dose of the Pfizer vaccine 4 months (122 days) after their second primary dose.   
 
What if my regular GP doesn’t offer the vaccine?

You can still schedule an in-person or virtual appointment (if offered) with your usual GP for the script, and visit another site for your vaccination such as your local vaccinating pharmacy.

COVID-19 vaccination after infection and with other vaccines

What is the vaccination advice for those who have already had COVID-19? 
Completing your primary course (for most people, this is two doses) and getting a booster if you’re eligible, is strongly encouraged, even if you’ve already had COVID-19. It’s recommended for people of all ages to wait 3 months after you test positive for COVID-19 before getting any COVID-19 vaccination because this can give you better protection and an increased immune response to the vaccine dose.  

How can we be confident that the vaccine is safe in the long-term given the short development and testing period?
In New Zealand, applications for all new medicines, including vaccines, are assessed by New Zealand's Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Authority (Medsafe). Medsafe is responsible for regulating all medicines and medical devices in New Zealand. They are part of the Ministry of Health. Medsafe will only approve a vaccine for use in New Zealand once they are confident it meets all the safety checks we have in New Zealand and complies with international standards for safety effectiveness and quality of the vaccine.

What does the COVID-19 vaccine mean for my flu vaccination?
COVID-19 vaccine can been given at the same time or close to other vaccinations on the National Immunisation Schedule, including MMR (measles, mumps, rubella vaccine), influenza (flu), human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV, Gardasil 9), whooping cough and tetanus (Tdap, Boostrix) and meningococcal vaccines. If given at the same time, the vaccines will be administered at separate places on your arms and with different syringes. 
When visiting your GP or pharmacist, ask if there are any other vaccines you can have - you may have missed them in the past. Pregnant women are also recommended to have influenza and whooping cough vaccines. Young adults may have missed MMR and HPV.
The only exception to this is the shingles vaccines, Zostavax, for which a seven day gap is recommended. This is to ensure the immune response to both vaccines is good. Zostavax can still be given at the same time as the influenza vaccine. 
The Varicella vaccine, which is a lower concentration and used mainly with children so their immune systems are much better than those over 50, can also be given at the same time as the COVID-19 vaccine.

Myocarditis and Pericarditis                                                                      

The Immunisation Advisory Centre emphasises that the overwhelming benefits of vaccination in protecting against COVID-19 greatly outweigh the rare risk of these conditions, and Comirnaty (Pfizer mRNA vaccine) continues to be recommended for all people ≥ 12 years of age who do not have any contraindications to the vaccine.

  • Myocarditis and pericarditis are usually caused by viral infections (including COVID-19), but they are also very rare and serious side effects of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. 
  • Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle, while pericarditis is inflammation of the tissue forming a sac around the heart.  
  • Symptoms of myocarditis or pericarditis linked to the vaccine generally appear within a few days, and mostly within the first few weeks after being vaccinated (including after the booster). If you get any of these new symptoms after your vaccination, you should seek medical help, especially if these symptoms don’t go away:  
    • tightness, heaviness, discomfort or pain in your chest or neck 
    • difficulty breathing or catching your breath 
    • feeling faint or dizzy or light-headed 
    • fluttering, racing or pounding heart, or feeling like it is ‘skipping beats’. 
  • If you feel any of these symptoms in the days or weeks after the vaccine, you should see a GP – there will be no charge for the consultation. You can also call Healthline on 0800 358 5453 anytime to get advice.   
  • If you’re concerned about your safety, call 111. Tell them you’ve had a COVID-19 vaccination so they can assess you properly. 
Novavax
  • The Novavax COVID-19 vaccine (Nuvaxovid) has been approved to be used as a primary vaccination course for people aged 18 and older in Aotearoa.
  • Novavax is not currently approved in New Zealand as a booster vaccine.  
  • Novavax is a protein-based COVID-19 vaccine which contains a non-infectious component on the surface of the Sars-CoV-2 virus, which induces a protective immune response when the body’s immune cells come into contact with it.
  • The vaccine helps prevent you from getting infected and having COVID-19 symptoms, or severe illness. The primary course of Novavax is two doses. It is recommended the second dose be administered three weeks after the first dose. 
  • The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine continues to be the preferred COVID-19 vaccine. Novavax, alongside AstraZeneca provides New Zealanders COVID-19 vaccination options. 
  • You will need to bring a prescription for Novavax with you to your appointment if Novavax will be your second dose, and you have had had a dose of Pfizer or another Covid-19 vaccine (in NZ or overseas)
  • If you require a consultation to discuss Novavax suitability and prescription, this is funded and should not incur any cost.
  • During your appointment, your vaccinator will ask you to give written consent.

How can I access Novavax? 

  • In Southern, Novavax is available at the Meridian Mall vaccination clinic, the Civic Theatre vaccination clinic and Cromwell Medical Centre.
  • To book your appointment go to: BookMyVaccine.nz which will give you the option to choose Novavax as your vaccine. A list of vaccination sites will be given where Novavax can be given as not all sites are equipped to deliver this vaccine. 
  • If you’re unable to book online, you can call the COVID Vaccination Healthline on: 0800 28 29 26 (8am to 8pm, 7 days a week).
  • If you are unable to attend a vaccination clinic due to disability or long-term ill-health, you can apply for additional support via the home-visit referral service

Why is Novavax only available at a limited number of clinics? 
With 95% of New Zealanders already vaccinated, we are starting with a small number of vaccines in comparison to Pfizer and will monitor uptake and supply. Similar to the AstraZeneca vaccine, Novavax vaccine will only be available at a limited number of sites across the country as Pfizer is the main vaccine we are using in New Zealand. 
 
Can I mix and match vaccines with Novavax?  
Novavax can be administered to people who have received a different COVID-19 vaccine as their first dose, and this should occur at least 28 days after the first dose of the other COVID-19 vaccine.  You will require a prescription for your second dose if your first dose was not Novavax. You can get a prescription at the vaccinating Novavax clinic or prior to your appointment with your preferred GP. Visits to a GP for a Novavax prescription are free. 
 
Can I get Novavax as a booster? 
No. Novavax is not approved as a booster vaccine. 
 
Why is the Government offering Novavax as an option now? 
We recognise that there is merit in providing an option for people who cannot receive the Pfizer vaccine, and those who want another option. We want to make sure everyone has the opportunity to be vaccinated. Pfizer remains the preferred COVID-19 vaccine for use in New Zealand. 
 
How does the safety of Novavax compare to the Pfizer or AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines?
The Novavax COVID-19 vaccine has a similar safety profile to the other COVID-19 vaccines that Medsafe has approved. At this stage, information about rare side effects after the Novavax vaccine is limited because the vaccine has had limited take-up around the world. More information will become available over time and the Ministry continues to monitor emerging information.

How effective is Novavax against different COVID-19 strains, such as Omicron? 
Laboratory tests suggest that Novavax has efficacy against the Omicron strain, but real-world data from people vaccinated with Novavax is not available yet.

What are the side effects of Novavax?
As with any vaccine, you may have some temporary side effects after receiving Novavax. This shows your immune system is working. Common side effects after Novavax include: 

  • injection site pain or tenderness  
  • tiredness 
  • headache 
  • muscle or joint pain 
  • generally feeling unwell
  • nausea or vomiting. 

Most side effects are mild and go away within a few days.  

What about rare side effects?
There are some side effects that are more serious but rare, like a severe allergic reaction or anaphylaxis. This is why people are observed for around 15 minutes post vaccination. Vaccinators are well-trained in managing these if they occur.
We don’t yet know if there are any other rare side effects after Novavax vaccine. More information will be available over time and the Ministry continues to monitor emerging information.

Who shouldn’t have Novavax?
It's not recommended that you have Novavax if you have had a severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) to a previous dose of the vaccine or to any component of the vaccine.

Is Novavax suitable for people who are severely immunocompromised?
Studies are ongoing into the best use of Novavax in this group. 

Is Novavax suitable for pregnant people or someone trying to get pregnant, or breastfeeding?
There is currently insufficient data on Novavax to recommend it during pregnancy. 
The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is the preferred option for someone who is pregnant, trying to get pregnant, or breastfeeding.

How does Novavax work with other vaccinations?
Novavax may be administered before, after, or at the same time as the influenza, MMR, HPV, diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis combination vaccine (Boostrix), and other vaccines. The only exception to this advice is for the shingles vaccine (Zostavax) where a 7-day interval is advised before or after administering the Novavax vaccine.  

If I need to meet a vaccination order/mandate, can I have 1 dose of Pfizer or AstraZeneca and 1 dose of Novavax? Can I get Novavax to meet a Vaccination Order/Mandate? 
No. Novavax is not currently part of the Vaccination Order requirements. The inclusion of Novavax as a primary vaccination course, for the purposes of the Vaccination Order, is being considered. 

What other countries use the Novavax vaccine?
The Novavax COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for use in 38 countries, including Australia, European Union member states, Singapore and the United Kingdom as a primary course vaccine.

AstraZeneca

The AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine is now available for those aged 18 and over who cannot receive the Pfizer vaccine, and for people who wish to have a different option to the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. 

Pfizer remains the preferred COVID-19 vaccine for use in New Zealand, reflecting its excellent safety and effectiveness profile. Both the Pfizer and AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines will protect you against the symptoms of COVID-19. Both vaccines are free.

How to get the AstraZeneca Vaccine

  • You can book via bookmyvaccine or by calling 0800 28 29 26. Regular clinics are available at limited sites in Dunedin, Invercargill, Queenstown and Oamaru. Additional pop-up clinic locations may be available in Alexandra, Gore, Balclutha and Te Anau subject to demand.
  • If you would like to be notified of future clinics in Alexandra, Gore, Balclutha or Te Anau please complete the AstraZeneca form
  • If you are unable to attend a vaccination clinic due to disability or long-term ill-health, you can apply for additional support via the home-visit referral service
  • You will need to bring a prescription for AstraZeneca with you to your appointment if:
    • AstraZeneca will be your second dose, and you have had had a dose of Pfizer or another Covid-19 vaccine (in NZ or overseas)
    • You wish to have AstraZeneca as a booster dose
  • If you require a consultation to discuss AstraZeneca suitability and prescription, this is funded and should not incur any cost.
  • During your appointment, your vaccinator will ask you to give written consent.
  • The interval between AstraZeneca doses is between 4 to 12 weeks. Your AstraZeneca dose should be at least 28 days after a different Covid-19 vaccine.
  • The interval between your second AstraZeneca primary dose and your booster dose should be discussed with an authorised prescriber. You will require a prescription for an AstraZeneca booster dose. 
  • This is important because you will get your best protection against COVID-19 after two doses.

Is the vaccine safe?
The AstraZeneca vaccine has been thoroughly assessed for safety by our own Medsafe experts.
Medsafe only grants consent for using a vaccine in Aotearoa once they’re satisfied the international evidence shows the benefits outweigh the risks.

Can I get it if I’m pregnant? 
There is insufficient data on the use of AstraZeneca in pregnant women, so Pfizer remains the preferred choice of vaccine for this group. If you’re pregnant, you can get a Pfizer vaccine at any stage of your pregnancy.  
Talk to your doctor about whether the AstraZeneca vaccine is suitable for you if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you think you may be pregnant.

Potential side effects
Like all medicines, you might experience some mild side effects 1–2 days after getting your vaccination. Most side effects do not last long and will not stop you from having a second dose or going about your daily life. 
The most common reported reactions are tenderness, pain, swelling, itch or redness at the injection site, feeling tired or fatigued, headache, muscle aches, chills, joint pain, fever, nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea.

You cannot have AstraZeneca if:

  • you’ve ever had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to the vaccine or its ingredients
  • you’ve ever had capillary leak syndrome: a rare condition causing fluid leakage from small blood vessels
  • you’ve experienced a major blood clot (thrombosis) in combination with low blood platelets (thrombocytopenia) following vaccination with any COVID-19 vaccine.

You should let your vaccinator know if:

  • you’ve ever had a major blood clot or low platelets in the past
  • you have an autoimmune condition that means you are more likely to have a clot
  • you’re pregnant.

It is recommended that people with a history of any of the above conditions discuss their situation, and the benefits and risks of AstraZeneca vaccination with a health professional. Most people will be able to receive AstraZeneca safely, but for some Pfizer may be the best choice. 

Rare side effects to watch out for
You should seek immediate medical attention if you develop symptoms in the days or weeks following your vaccination, such as:

  • a severe or persistent headache, blurred vision, confusion or seizures 
  • shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling, leg pain or persistent abdominal pain 
  • unusual skin bruising or pinpoint round spots beyond the site of vaccination. 

Serious allergic reactions do happen but are extremely rare. They usually show soon after you’ve had your vaccine, which is why you need to wait at least 15 minutes. If you do have a serious allergic reaction, vaccinators are trained to manage these.
If you are unsure about your symptoms or if they get worse, call Healthline on 0800 358 5453. If you have an immediate concern about your safety, call 111, and make sure you tell them you’ve had a COVID-19 vaccination so that they can assess you properly.

Accessibility and support 

The Ministry of Health has provided resources about COVID-19 in a variety of accessible formats.

I am unable to leave the house due to health reasons. How can I get my vaccine?
If you are unable to attend your local COVID-19 vaccine clinic, please complete this form or call 03 476 9977 and we will do our best to support your requirements

Are your clinics accessible to those using wheelchairs or mobility aids?
Our mass-vaccination clinic spaces in Dunedin and Invercargill are accessible for wheelchairs and mobility aids. There are also many other locations across the Southern district where you can receive your vaccine, including GPs and pharmacies. Please contact these individual providers to discuss their accessibility.

Can I bring a support person or assistance animal to my vaccination appointment?
Yes, you are welcome to bring a support person or certified assistance dog. 

Is there support for sensory, auditory or other sensitivities?
If you experience environmental sensitivities, please email covaxadmin@southerndhb.govt.nz or call 0800 829 768 and we will do our best to support your requirements. 

Are interpretation or NZ Sign Language services available?
If you require an interpreter during your appointment, please contact Patient Affairs and Enquiries office on 03 474 0999, or email interpreter@southerndhb.govt.nz. Interpretation services are available in 55 languages and are free of charge.

Is there any written information I need to read or sign at my appointment?
No, there is not. All information will be communicated verbally. Vaccine consent is also verbal. If for any reason this is not the case, you will be provided with support. 

Booking information

How can people book if they do not have access to the internet?
You can book now by visiting bookmyvaccine.nz or by calling 0800 28 29 26 (8am to 8pm, 7 days a week).

How can I change my appointment?
If you booked your appointment through the online booking system, you can log back in to amend your booking. Alternatively, please call 0800 28 29 26 (8am to 8pm, 7 days a week). Please note if your change means there is less than 21 days between doses, you will be prompted to change the other appointment to maintain the gap between doses.

Vaccinations and employment

Can my employer insist I receive a vaccine?
Vaccinations are mandatory for border and MIQ workers, prison staff and health and disability sector workers — including aged care workers. Certain roles, such as NZ Police, NZ Defence Force and Fire and Emergency New Zealand, may also be captured by government vaccine mandates, if they are working in an environment where a mandate is required. Visit the Unite Against COVID-19 website for details.
Workers covered by a government vaccine mandate are required to be vaccinated because they come into close contact with people who are likely to get seriously ill if they get COVID-19. Border workers, including those at MIQ, airports and maritime ports must be vaccinated because they are likely to be exposed to new variants. 
COVID-19 booster vaccinations are also mandated for workforces covered by the COVID-19 Public Health Response (Vaccinations) Order 2021 (Vaccinations Order). This means workers in these sectors must get a booster 6 months (183 days) after they complete their primary vaccination course. If eligible, we recommend you get your booster after 3 months.  
You must be 18 years or older to receive a booster dose. If you are under 18 years old and have had your primary vaccination course, you can continue to work.    

I want to be a vaccinator. How do I apply? 
Find out more about joining our vaccinator workforce.

Vaccine passports

Proof of vaccination status
You can request 3 free official records of your COVID-19 vaccination status through My Covid Record.

  • My Vaccine Pass — which you can use as proof of your COVID-19 vaccination status for use within Aotearoa New Zealand. My Vaccine Pass is a QR code which you can add to a digital wallet, like your phone. 
  • My Vaccine Record — which has more detailed information about your COVID-19 vaccination recording including batch numbers, dose number, vaccine type and any overseas vaccinations that have been added to your health record.  
  • International Travel Vaccination Certificate — which you can use to travel overseas.

How to get proof of your vaccination status through My Covid Record

What if I am fully vaccinated, but there’s an error with scanning the code?
We’re working to ensure people can easily access support options if they find their certificate isn’t working. The design we are using is available offline and we are focused on making it as simple as possible.

Can people access other vaccination information on My COVID Record such as Flu or Measles?
No, it is currently only for COVID-19 proof of vaccination and test results. In the New Year we could look at options to extend its use based on what we learn.

How will we check the QR Codes?
A verifier app has been developed to read the QR codes which can be downloaded onto a smartphone or tablet. This scanning tool doesn’t retain any personal health information.

Our event doesn’t have internet access, is that ok?
Yes. The verifier app is designed to be operated without constant internet access.

Will records be required at all restaurants and events?
We’re still working through the settings where record keeping of proof of vaccination will be compulsory.

Will it cost me any money to use the app?
The app will be free.

Who can access the app? Will it be restricted access?
The app will be accessible by anyone with a smartphone with access to the Apple or Google Play stores.

Why haven’t you asked for ID for people getting vaccinated and how do we know it was the right person?
A conscious decision was made earlier on in the vaccination programme rollout to support as many people to be vaccinated as possible which meant trusting New Zealanders to do the right thing. While it is possible to get vaccinated in someone else’s name we are asking New Zealanders to act in a trustworthy way. It is worth noting that this is an offence under the COVID Act, and there are health risks to receiving treatment not needed for you.

How do we know the certificates will be accepted overseas?
The international certificates are separate to the domestic certificates. These will meet EU standards for proof of vaccination to enable international travel. The government is currently talking with EU officials to make sure it is accepted there and officials have begun the same conversation with other international jurisdictions.
At this point, it is the closest thing that exists to a universal way to prove your vaccination status for international travel.

Possible COVID-19 Scams

woman questioning

Be aware of scams

Scammers take every opportunity and unfortunately the COVID-19 Vaccine roll-out isn't immune. Remember, the COVID-19 vaccine is FREE. At no point will you be asked to pay for the vaccine, or pay for your place in the queue. If you are, it's likely a scam. More information, including how to report a scam, can be found here